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10/24/2010

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Catherine Brooks of Eco-Strip

Thanks for the comparison between the two methods. This is good stuff which I will put on our website www.eco-strip for our customers to keep them up to date. They are homeowners, contractors and historic restorationist using the RRP-Compliant speedheater infrared paint remover.

Lorisa Seibel

Good review; I look forward to more. One correction:

Lead-Check is approved on any color; there may be an error in the RRP training. Here is the question, answer, and link from EPA:

Does EPA recognize the LeadCheck test kit for use on red paint?

Yes. EPA recognizes this kit for use on any color paint as long as the kit is used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

http://toxics.supportportal.com/ics/support/default.asp?deptID=23019

Deborah Garrity

thanks so much for taking the time to publish this. It is really needed to get a grasp of which test to use when and which performs better. Now, better informed, we can make up our own minds. The availability issue could become a problem, however.

Laura A Peters Cherry City Remodeling Salem OR

From what I have read Lead Check Swabs do test for lead in paint on sheetrock and drywall. There is even a video on how to do it at www.quickandeasyleadtestkits.com that is put out by LeadCheck TM Swabs.
The instructors in the RRP Classes are using these swabs and giving out a discount code to use on this website. The code is EPA if you need the product and want to save some money.

I have used them and they are by far the better way to test...30 seconds instead of hours...obvious results...if there is red there is lead...

I do not need to send the samples in to a lab...you do not have to have the special tool, to get the exact size for the tests to turn out correctly, you do not have to measure Liquid Part A and Liquid Part B and hope you did it right.

WJ Andres

Liked your test, Bill, and was looking forward to your promised update. From what I've seen and read elsewhere, some of the info from other correspondents is incorrect: the swab test does not work on all colors and it cannot be used(successfully anyway) on plaster and drywall surfaces.

Also: There is a ppm threshold for lead... merely detecting that lead is present doesn't mean you know how much lead there is, right? The swab just indicated that lead is present, but how much? To me, it looks like the D-Lead test showed the presence of lead, but I'd agree with you the color was not dark enough to indicate it was over the EPA threshold.

Anyway, I hope you'll do more on this comparison in the future!

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